Tag Archives: capitalism politics alternative satire

Unicorn – funny or not?

Every now and again I submit something to one of the online magazines that publish very short pieces. It’s partly the challenge of condensing down to so few words, and they’re often a lot of fun too.

Recently, I submitted on the theme of Unicorns. I wasn’t surprised when they turned down the piece as I did stretch the intention behind the theme, quite a bit. But, from their feedback, I’m not sure they got the humour.

Oh well, here it is for your enjoyment…

Transgenic

Reg throws another rock. One rock that joins the many pelting the deniers’ citadel.

Angry mob or legitimate protest; choose your side.

The Unicorn exists and it’s far too dangerous to be kept secret.

We, the protesters, protest and the rocks hail down.

Why was it brought into existence? It’s incomprehensible.

‘No GM. No GM,’ we chant.

A man steps from the glass fortress and is struck on the head by several rocks. The blood is disgusting. And, so is he.

Releasing Unicorn, the genetically modified corn designed to wipe out all other corn is unforgivable.

Reg throws another rock.


photo credit: Madame Licorne photos officielles via photopin (license)

Pumped Up Presidents

I’m making a slight deviation from the usual monthly written story to bring you a video of me reading Pumped Up Presidents as part of the Virtual Futures Near-Future Fictions Series.

The spark for this tale of future presidents was a piece I saw from Futurism on In-Ear Translators.

Take a look – I hope you enjoy it.

 



And, don’t forget…

Eating Robots and Other Stories is out on 31 May 2017.


photo credit: txmx 2 via photopin (license)

if corporations governed us…

Have you ever been in a supermarket queue with someone shouting in your general direction that there are plenty of empty self-service tills? I have. I was in one when I started to ponder what it might be like if the corporations governed us.

As I waited disobediently, I couldn’t help observe how the drive towards self-service affected the way the staff interacted with their customers. I understand the desire to reduce costs and that’s fair enough, so long as there’s a sufficiently level playing field for others to offer alternatives. Personally, I’d rather pay a little more and have some human contact, or even a little bit more than that and still have local independent shops.

Anyway, my thoughts meandered into the territory of the National Health Service. Would a similarly dehumanised health service be characterised by stressed and low paid staff shouting at queues of the sick? Shouts to cajole and point out that you can queue for an x-ray if you want, but there are plenty of self-service booths available and it’ll be a lot faster.

On the other hand, a loyalty scheme that gave the most frequent users the most reward points could be a winner.

Am I being unfair? Possibly.

Anyone for a self-service eye test or a do-it-yourself cancer diagnosis?